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Memory, Concentration & Performance

Nootropics | Concentration Capsules | Focus | Memory.

You use your brain all day long, even if you are not aware of it

You use your brain all day long, even when you’re not aware of it. Schoolchildren notice that they use their brain a lot, as they have to study for tests, answer questions in class and then absorb even more information. After spending all day paying attention and concentrating at school, they have to start all over again to do their homework when they get home. To the point where they may feel their brains can’t take in any more new information. When you need to concentrate and perform all day, your brain can use a bit of help.

Concentration

‘Concentrate!’ is something you often hear when you need to focus on a task. During school or in an exam, but also later in life when you’ve already been working for a long time. Concentration is the ability to focus your attention on the same task for a long time. It’s difficult to keep your attention focused, as devoting your attention to one thing means that you only allow information into your brain selectively. During your work or lessons, you’re constantly being tempted to relax your attention by various different stimuli from all around you. By ignoring these distracting stimuli and only allowing the important information to reach you, you are able to concentrate.

Attention span

Everyone has a different attention span. Where one person can stay focused on a task for hours on end, another gets distracted after five minutes. This has to do with your ability to concentrate. Some people can set distractions aside very easily, while the slightest thing causes others to lose track of what they are doing. You can’t keep your attention tightly focused all the time - you need to relax sometimes too, so that you can go back to concentrating fully on your work afterwards. Short breaks, healthy food and drinking lots of water are important to help your brain keep your attention focused.

Distraction diminishes attention

These days, distractions are always close at hand, even if you’re very good at working with full concentration. A message on your phone, a passing car, the radio, a flushing toilet, that game on the tablet or video on your phone - they’re all distractions that interrupt your concentration. When your concentration is interrupted, your brain tries to focus on both things (work and, for example, a game), so you lose your focus on the task at hand. With the result that your performance deteriorates.

Take charge of distracting stimuli

Distraction can be caused by too many internal stimuli, boredom, too little fuel (fluids and food) or too many external stimuli. Internal stimuli originate from yourself. You’re just not in the mood any more, you let yourself be distracted by videos on the internet or by everything around you. To get your attention back where you want it, it helps if you literally put aside distractions that originate from yourself. So put away your phone and get to work. Reward yourself with five minutes of screen time when you’ve finished a task, so you can then go on again feeling refreshed. External stimuli originate from other people and are difficult for you to control. Of course, you can tell everyone that you really need to get to work now and you don’t want to be disturbed for a while. This will help. You can reduce street noise considerably by using noise-cancelling headphones. When your brain is ‘switched on’ more, it will use more energy. So make sure you top up the fuel for your brain in good time. Eat healthily and drink plenty of water and the occasional soft drink, coffee or tea to ensure your brain gets the energy it needs. This will definitely help you concentrate. Taking in good fuel for your brain also helps your performance.

Performing well

When you’re at school and studying, your knowledge is measured based on your performance. You’ll need to show at set times that you’ve mastered the knowledge relevant in that school year. But you’ll also need the knowledge you’ve gained to perform during your working life too. Having to perform isn’t a bad thing, but it can make you nervous. What will happen if you don’t perform well so you make mistakes and fail? Stress and anxiety about exams and other times when you have to perform can reduce your concentration and focus. That’s because, when you’re stressed, your body reduces the blood supply to the brain to reroute this to your muscles ready for fight or flight behaviour. This makes you less able to concentrate during a test or presentation. When you need to perform, it’s important that you’re relaxed. Good preparation (studying, preparing a presentation, making a summary) helps you to concentrate when you have to perform. You should also make sure you get a good night’s sleep and eat healthily.

Memory

Your memory is the part of your brain where information is stored. Information comes in here all day long. This information is stored best when you sleep, enabling you to use it again later. This means sleep is really important so that you can absorb and retain what you need to learn. You can stay up all night revising, but it won’t guarantee that you remember everything you do or study. You can think of your memory as a really big chest of drawers, with drawers full of recollections, information and lots more. All these drawers are connected together and to recall something you’ve learned you’ll need to make lots more connections. Retaining information is a three-step process: in step 1 your sensory memory stores all the impressions around you very briefly; in step 2 you filter out the most important information and store this in your working memory (short-term memory). A person can retain up to seven new pieces of information in their working memory, but you don’t keep all of this in step 3 (your long-term memory or reference memory). To transfer information from your short-term memory to your long-term memory, you will need to do a lot of repetition when studying. You need good concentration for this, as otherwise you won’t be able to perform.

Give your brain a boost

Dr. Becky Brain Booster contains various ingredients that help to improve your concentration and relieve anxiety. This means you’re better able to keep your attention focused and you can study and perform better. If you have any questions, get in touch with Dr. Becky. We’ll be happy to help and advise you on how to study more successfully.

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Dr Becky Brain Booster | 60 Vegan caps
Dr BeckyBrain Booster | 60 Vegan caps

● Concentration & Focus

● Memory & Mental performance

● Nootropics | Certified Ingredients

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€49,75 Incl. tax
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Overige categorieën in Concentration & Memory

Memory, Concentration & Performance

You use your brain all day long, even if you are not aware of it

You use your brain all day long, even when you’re not aware of it. Schoolchildren notice that they use their brain a lot, as they have to study for tests, answer questions in class and then absorb even more information. After spending all day paying attention and concentrating at school, they have to start all over again to do their homework when they get home. To the point where they may feel their brains can’t take in any more new information. When you need to concentrate and perform all day, your brain can use a bit of help.

Concentration

‘Concentrate!’ is something you often hear when you need to focus on a task. During school or in an exam, but also later in life when you’ve already been working for a long time. Concentration is the ability to focus your attention on the same task for a long time. It’s difficult to keep your attention focused, as devoting your attention to one thing means that you only allow information into your brain selectively. During your work or lessons, you’re constantly being tempted to relax your attention by various different stimuli from all around you. By ignoring these distracting stimuli and only allowing the important information to reach you, you are able to concentrate.

Attention span

Everyone has a different attention span. Where one person can stay focused on a task for hours on end, another gets distracted after five minutes. This has to do with your ability to concentrate. Some people can set distractions aside very easily, while the slightest thing causes others to lose track of what they are doing. You can’t keep your attention tightly focused all the time - you need to relax sometimes too, so that you can go back to concentrating fully on your work afterwards. Short breaks, healthy food and drinking lots of water are important to help your brain keep your attention focused.

Distraction diminishes attention

These days, distractions are always close at hand, even if you’re very good at working with full concentration. A message on your phone, a passing car, the radio, a flushing toilet, that game on the tablet or video on your phone - they’re all distractions that interrupt your concentration. When your concentration is interrupted, your brain tries to focus on both things (work and, for example, a game), so you lose your focus on the task at hand. With the result that your performance deteriorates.

Take charge of distracting stimuli

Distraction can be caused by too many internal stimuli, boredom, too little fuel (fluids and food) or too many external stimuli. Internal stimuli originate from yourself. You’re just not in the mood any more, you let yourself be distracted by videos on the internet or by everything around you. To get your attention back where you want it, it helps if you literally put aside distractions that originate from yourself. So put away your phone and get to work. Reward yourself with five minutes of screen time when you’ve finished a task, so you can then go on again feeling refreshed. External stimuli originate from other people and are difficult for you to control. Of course, you can tell everyone that you really need to get to work now and you don’t want to be disturbed for a while. This will help. You can reduce street noise considerably by using noise-cancelling headphones. When your brain is ‘switched on’ more, it will use more energy. So make sure you top up the fuel for your brain in good time. Eat healthily and drink plenty of water and the occasional soft drink, coffee or tea to ensure your brain gets the energy it needs. This will definitely help you concentrate. Taking in good fuel for your brain also helps your performance.

Performing well

When you’re at school and studying, your knowledge is measured based on your performance. You’ll need to show at set times that you’ve mastered the knowledge relevant in that school year. But you’ll also need the knowledge you’ve gained to perform during your working life too. Having to perform isn’t a bad thing, but it can make you nervous. What will happen if you don’t perform well so you make mistakes and fail? Stress and anxiety about exams and other times when you have to perform can reduce your concentration and focus. That’s because, when you’re stressed, your body reduces the blood supply to the brain to reroute this to your muscles ready for fight or flight behaviour. This makes you less able to concentrate during a test or presentation. When you need to perform, it’s important that you’re relaxed. Good preparation (studying, preparing a presentation, making a summary) helps you to concentrate when you have to perform. You should also make sure you get a good night’s sleep and eat healthily.

Memory

Your memory is the part of your brain where information is stored. Information comes in here all day long. This information is stored best when you sleep, enabling you to use it again later. This means sleep is really important so that you can absorb and retain what you need to learn. You can stay up all night revising, but it won’t guarantee that you remember everything you do or study. You can think of your memory as a really big chest of drawers, with drawers full of recollections, information and lots more. All these drawers are connected together and to recall something you’ve learned you’ll need to make lots more connections. Retaining information is a three-step process: in step 1 your sensory memory stores all the impressions around you very briefly; in step 2 you filter out the most important information and store this in your working memory (short-term memory). A person can retain up to seven new pieces of information in their working memory, but you don’t keep all of this in step 3 (your long-term memory or reference memory). To transfer information from your short-term memory to your long-term memory, you will need to do a lot of repetition when studying. You need good concentration for this, as otherwise you won’t be able to perform.

Give your brain a boost

Dr. Becky Brain Booster contains various ingredients that help to improve your concentration and relieve anxiety. This means you’re better able to keep your attention focused and you can study and perform better. If you have any questions, get in touch with Dr. Becky. We’ll be happy to help and advise you on how to study more successfully.

Memory, Concentration & Performance